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End Note

The usual rhombic dodecahedron (Figure 1e) and the rhombic dodecahedron of the second kind (Figure 2c) each have 12 identical rhombic faces, but of different shapes. Johannes Keppler discovered the first, but origin of the second is unclear. Although Coxeter [3, p. 31] cites a 1960 reference as its first publication, I have observed that it appears in the form of a pop-up paper model (!) in a 1787 geometry text [5].


Converted by Mathematica      September 30, 1999

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